Record of Contributions

The contributors.md file and the contributors table in the README file together form the record of contributions in The Turing Way.

Contributions to The Turing Way may include but are not limited to, bug fixing, chapter planning, writing, editing, reviewing, idea generation, presentation, project management, and maintenance. We recognise all these contributions and acknowledge our community members fairly. For example, using all contributors bot we update the contributors table with each person’s name, where the emoji keys indicate the different tasks they have done (see the README file). We understand that different contributions mean different things to people and may translate differently towards their personal interest, skill development, value exchange and advancement of their careers. Therefore, we also offer the contributors.md file as a dedicated location to capture personal highlights from The Turing Way community members.

Individual contributors are welcome to provide their details under the section “Personal Highlights from The Turing Way Contributors”. Organisational support and collaborations are listed in the section, “Collaborating Organisations”. Each organisation name and details will be listed separately followed by contribution details of each individual contributor from that organisation.

Please see the community handbook for details on how you can be fairly acknowledged for your work.

Personal Highlights from The Turing Way Contributors

Please use this section to highlight your personal experiences in The Turing Way project and community. You can also describe the impact The Turing Way may have on you or your team members such as in promoting reproducible, ethical, collaborative and inclusive research practices.

This record can be used in your personal or professional portfolio (profile, CV, resume) by describing features you have enhanced, goals you have accomplished, skills you gain, opportunities you receive, personal connections you make, individuals you support and values you create through your involvement in The Turing Way.

See this entry as an example by Kirstie Whitaker, the project lead:

Kirstie Whitaker

I’m the lead of Tools, Practices and Systems research Programme at the Alan Turing Institute. I have a PhD in Neuroscience from the University of California at Berkeley and conducted my postdoctoral research at the University of Cambridge in the Brain Mapping Unit. I am a Mozilla fellowship (2016) and Fulbright scholarship (2007) alumna.

  • Personal highlights:

I am the lead of The Turing Way. I’ve done a lot of advocacy for changing research culture to make our work more efficient and effective, and I’ve noticed that we need to address the power structures in academia if we are to truly make research reproducible by default. I’m excited to build the Turing Way to both inspire the people who DO the research to make all their outputs as accessible as possible, and to nudge everyone else in the ecosystem to care about the work required to do so.

  • More information:

I’m really passionate about the concept of making science “open for all”. I take that to mean we should share all of our outputs - the data, code and protocols that we develop - whether they’re “significant” or not. But it also includes making those outputs FAIR - findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable. I am an advocate for greater diversity in STEM and in data science and particularly passionate about improving the ways we reward collaborative and supportive working. Finally, I’d like to pivot to having data science project be developed in the open from the beginning and with a decision making governance process that is inclusive and community-lead.

Contributors names should be added alphabetically

Alexander Morley

  • Role: Infrastructure Maintainer (2018 - 2019)

  • GitHub id: alexmorley

  • ORCID: TBA

  • Short bio:

I am a Mozilla Fellow (2018-) and a PhD Candidate at the MRC Brain Network Dynamics Unit at the University of Oxford (2015-). I also receive support from the Software Sustainability Institute Fellowship programme (2018) and Microsoft/Research Software England Cloud Computing Fellowship programme (2018). My undergraduate degree was in Medicine at the University of Oxford (2012-2015).

  • Personal Highlight:

As a core contributros I want to share “Why I care about the Turing Way?: When people don’t use best practices in data science its almost always because they either don’t know about them, or feel they don’t have time. Advocates will tell people that the time is saved in the long-term, but it’s a hard sell. By providing concrete, incremental, but authoritative, guidance I believe the Turing Way could provide the nudge that allows people to realise the benefits for themselves, and lowers the barrier for more researchers to acquire these highly valued skills.

  • More information:

I really want research to be accessible, but in a much broader sense than the word is often used. I would love to see a world where re-mixing research is a common thing, whether that be re-mixing figures to make them easier to understand, re-using data to generate new insights, or testing new methods to see how our theories might need to change. Slightly less on topic, but just as important, I am also passionate about the development and adoption of best-practices in governance. Safe and inclusive spaces are all too rare in academia, and I think some part of that can be solved by doing away with our laissez-faire attitude towards governance and management.

Andreea Avramescu

  • Role: Book Dash 2021 participant

  • GitHub id: https://github.com/andreea-avramescu

  • ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6837-6272

  • Short bio:

I am a PhD student at the Alliance Manchester Business School, the University of Manchester (supervised by Dr. Richard Allmendinger and Dr. Manuel López-Ibáñez) and an Engage@Turing/Enrichment Student at The Alan Turing Institute. My research interests lie in the fields of personalised medicine, optimisation and data science, and how all these can be used together to improve the availability and accessibility of targeted treatments worldwide. I have an MSc in Data Science and have previously worked on various research problems from within the fields of social sciences, law, computer science, and operations research.

  • Personal highlights:

Throughout the week I had the chance to improve a chapter on project design and review existing PRs. i also engaged in discussions with the team around the general challenges encountered in reproducible research and project design.

  • Quotes:

The 2021 May Book Dash was an exciting and inspiring opportunity. The events throughout the week were extremely well organised and the inclusive environment was very welcoming.

Anna Krystalli

I’m a Research Software Engineer at the University of Sheffield helping researchers do more with their code and data. I’m also an editor for rOpenSci, a community of users and developers, Creating technical infrastructure of peer-reviewed R software tools for working with scientific data sources on the web.

  • More information:

I care about reproducible research in R! I learnt to code during my PhD in Marine Macroecology and was instantly hooked. Building on past experience as a quality assurance auditor, my experiences made me interested in how we practice science and specifically how we can do more out of the real workhorses of modern research, our code and data. Working in The Turing Way is a fantastic opportunity to take stock of the great work that has already been done in this space, aggregate and distill it to templates, checklists and best practices guidelines that are immediately useful to researchers. It’s an opportunity to set standards and harness the power of convention, especially with ECRs that have an opportunity to set up good practices from the start! Indeed, I hope the Turing Way will very much become the “Sheffield Way” too!

Arielle Bennett

  • Role: Research Project Manager, Tools, Practices & Systems Programme, Book Dash May 2021 Organising Committee

  • GitHub id: Arielle-Bennett

  • ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0154-2982

  • Short bio:

I am the Research Project Manager for the Tools, Practices & Systems Programme at the Alan Turing Institute, a critical research infrastructure role ensuring smooth delivery of complex collaborations, initiatives and overall programme strategy. The programme is focused on developing and enhancing the culture change, research tools, and knowledge needed to support open source, multidisciplinary work across data science and beyond. I have worked in research infrastructure roles since graduating with a BA in Natural Sciences, resulting in a breadth of understanding across the complex ecosystem of research publishing, start ups, community and project management. Following my Community Engagement Fellowship in 2019 with the Center for Scientific Collaboration & Community Engagement, I am an active member of the CSCCE community, sitting on their Code of Conduct Committee and organising the Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Special Interest Group.

  • Personal highlights:

Before participating in the Turing Way, I didn’t know what a pull request was, nevermind how to make one! Now I have contributed to several different parts of the five guides, including co-writing the initial chapters on activism for researchers and given presentations on the topic at conferences. I also now mentor other community contributors on how to create pull requests, contribute to existing chapters, review others work, and draft new ideas. The May 2021 Book Dash was an amazing opportunity to engage with the community and get excited about the project all over again! I came away from it feeling enthused and proud of the contributions people made with my support - it will be brilliant to see how these evolve over the coming months into content and chapters.

  • Personal Quote:

The Book Dash is an incredible experience for both newer and established community members. It is joyful work to spend focused time on developing content for the Turing Way and supporting people from across the globe to contribute. I feel lucky to have been able to take part and take on a more prominent role as part of the organising committee.

Batool Almarzouq

I’m the founder of R-Ladies in Saudi Arabia (Dammam). I initially majored in pharmacology but quickly developed an interest in biochemistry, structural biology, and bioinformatics. I enjoy applying deep learning to answer biological questions.

  • Personal highlights:

I am currently co-developing a chapter on “CI services”. I have helped upgrade the Jupyter Book Infrastructure and add hypothes.is to enable collaborative annotation of The Turing Way chapters. I have also translated the README.me chapter in Arabic. Personal quote: “I find it hard to express my personal thoughts and feelings in words. This was such an amazing experience. It helped me to develop my technical skills. Thank you so much to everyone I met in this Book Dash event :heart:.”

Becki Green

  • Role: Book Dash 2021 participant

  • Github id: beckigreen

  • ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0513-5188

  • Short bio:

I am a PhD student at King’s College London (supervised by Dr Petroula Proitsi & Professor Marcus Richards) and Engage student at The Alan Turing Institute. My PhD project aims to identify early mechanisms and biological markers of dementia, and I am currently also working on the DECOVID project at the Institute.

  • Personal highlights:

Working alongside such wonderful people and learning so much! A truly enriching and rewarding experience - I look forward to contributing in future events. A further highlight was gaining experience in working collaboratively on a large project, including reviewing my first pull request!

  • Quotes:

A welcoming and enriching environment. Collaborating with others was really valuable and has provided me with tools to apply to my research and share with others.

Becky Arnold

I’m an astrophysics PhD student at the University of Sheffield and I do computer simulations of star forming regions. I’m a 2018 Software Sustainability Institute fellow using the funds to organise talks and workshops about various issues surrounding good programming practise.

  • More information:

I am passionate about Science. All over the world humans come together to try and figure out how the universe works and that’s amazing, just as amazing as the answers themselves. I’m also passionate about how we actually do that science, making sure it’s accurate and reproducible. If it isn’t both of those things we haven’t moved forwards much, or worse still end up going in circles. I care deeply about changing the culture of academia, in which abuse of power (both minor and major) is all too common. I’ve met so many people that want to code well and follow best practise, which will benefit science enormously, but struggle to know how to do so. While there are lots of fantastic resources out there they’re often scattered and The Turing Way can improve that. I also hope that it can convince people that don’t consider themselves capable of being good programmers that there are steps they can take to drastically improve their coding.

Benjamin Mummery

While studying Astrophyics, Benjamin was the first speaker at, and later organizer of, Liverpool PubHD (Facebook, Twitter) - a monthly cross-discipline event that challenged PhD students to “explain their research in 10 minutes, while enjoying a pint.” During this time he also developed and delivered multiple more official outreach events including presenting to both the public and airforce commanders at RAF Cosford Airshow, and frequent activities for schools. Now a Research Software Engineer at the Hartree Centre, he has continued his engagement with outreach, most recently in collaboration with Tim Powell designing a LEGO version of the Centre’s iconic supercomputer Scafell Pike. He can frequently be found banging on about fictional time travel.

  • Personal highlights:

I collaborated with a group of researchers from The Alan Turing Institute to draft a chapter of scientific outreach.

Camila Rangel Smith

I am a Research Data Scientist at The Alan Turing Institute. I hold a PhD in Particle Physics from Université Paris Diderot where I worked on the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. During my PhD I participated on the discovery of the Higgs Boson particle announced by CERN in 2012. I continued working on ATLAS as a postdoc with Uppsala University where I focused on searches for physics beyond the Standard Model of Particle Physics. Right before joining the Turing, I worked as Data Scientist in the EdTech sector developing innovative products focused on the assessment process in education. Currently I’m working in collaboration with researchers from the Global Systems Institute at University of Exeter called Data science for Sustainable Development. In this project we are using remote sensing to monitor the resilience of patterned vegetation from semi-arid dryland ecosystems in the Sahel.

  • Personal highlights

I think The Turing Way is an excellent resource that can change the way science is done (I wish I had it when I started my PhD!). Although the international language of science is English, I know for a fact that not everyone in places like Latin-American have the time and resources to learn it, so I think we must do everything we can to break those barriers and improve the accessibility of knowledge for everyone. This is my motivation to translate the book to Spanish, and I hope that the Spanish version will be used as an important resource on the master course we are developing in LA-CoNGA physics project.

  • More information

I’m from Venezuela, and although I have done most of my career in Europe I’ve been always keen to stay connected to the academic and scientific wold back in Latin-America. I’m the co-founder of the CEVALE2VE project (http://www.cevale2ve.org/en/home/), which of a virtual learning community that aims to tackle the serious issue of brain-drain in some Latin-American countries by bringing back the knowledge in a digital/online platform. More recently that project has become consolidated into LA-CoNGA physics (http://laconga.redclara.net/), an EU Erasmus+ funded project with a mission to create a Latin American and European Community for Advanced Physics. In this project I’m helping to build a data science module that will be thought in an online master course.

Emma Karoune

  • Role:

    • Core Contributor

    • Book Dash November 2020 Attendee

    • Book Dash Planning Committee 2021

  • GitHub id: EKaroune

  • ORCID: 0000-0002-6576-6053

  • Short bio: I’m a Research Associate and Community Manager of DECOVID at The Alan Turing Institute. I’m also a post-doctoral researcher working in the field of Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoecology. I have a PhD in Palaeoecology from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. I am leading a project to improve the FAIRness of phytolith data. I am also working on a project with Historic England concerning the development of novel methodologies in phytolith research for application to British Archaeological remains.

  • Personal highlights:

I have really enjoyed working in such a collaborative way during the Book Dash. I have had interesting discussions concerning the accessibility of The Turing way, collaboration, communication and research in general with other contributors. I have further developed my Github skills by working in collaboration with @paulowoicho, @malvikasharan and @KirstieJane to develop a chapter on ‘Getting started on Github’. This improvement in my skills will really benefit my own personal research to develop my own collaborative working groups and teach others how to use these research tools. In 2021 Book Dash, I’ve enjoyed mentoring new contributors contributions, reviewing pull requests and helping to run sessions during the Book Dash. It was great to work collaboratively to improve and publish a new chapter on ‘Communicating with wider audiences’ in the Guide for Communication.

  • More information:

I try to work as openly as possible and a large part of my current research is developing easy and accessible to all collaborative and open ways of working. I am also working hard to bring together specialists in my field into a working group for Open Science so that we can work collaboratively towards subject-specific FAIR guidelines for phytolith data.

  • Quotes:

Such a great week! Supportive collaborative environment to produce some really quality contributions to this wonderful project.

Eric Daub

  • GitHub id: edaub

  • Short bio:

Eric is a data scientist and geophysics researcher, has appeared on several television programs and podcasts to discuss his research on earthquake occurrence in the Central United States. One challenge for presenting earthquake research is the tendency to overhype results on the topic of earthquake prediction. Eric used these media appearances to highlight the difficulties inherent in predicting earthquakes, and explain why no reliable method exists to predict earthquakes accurately enough for societal actions to take place. From that discussion about overhyped results, he transitioned to explaining how his research showed that the chances of an earthquake had not changed due to recent changes in activity, as the fluctuations were exactly in line with what would be expected for a simple baseline level of risk. This outreach activity helped improve the understanding of the target audience on a complex, technical subject and debunk some of the commonly held assumptions about earthquake prediction and risk management.

  • Personal highlights:

I collaborated with a group of researchers from The Alan Turing Institute to draft a chapter of scientific outreach.

Hannah Nicholls

  • Role: Book Dash 2021 participant

  • GitHub id: hlnicholls

  • ORCID:https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3480-7852

  • Short bio:

I am a PhD student contributing to The Turing Way to develop writing about reproducible research practices. I have a BSc in biomedical science and a background in wet-lab cardiovascular research. My PhD is in applying machine learning to prioritise most likely causal disease genes from genome-wide association studies.

  • Personal highlights:

Collaborating with others to build something new as a contribution to The Turing Way, and collaborating with others to review and support their work. Understanding the inner workings of The Turing Way via navigating within its GitHub. Also getting to help and watch a really cool illustration being made!

  • Quotes:

Taking part in the Turing Way Book Dash was one of the first times I’ve done collaborative working over an extended period of time and it was such a great experience! It allowed me to try out new skills and really build confidence in what I was doing, I feel really encouraged to continue contributing to The Turing Way!

Heidi Seibold

I lead a group on Open AI in Health at the Helmholtz Zentrum Munich. I develop machine learning methods to figure out which patients react well to certain treatments and implements these methods in R. My passion for open and reproducible research has led me to join the Turing Way community. I am involved in meta-research projects (research about research), I support, teach and contribute to open projects such as The Turing Way. My work for the Journal of Statistical Software includes reproducibility checks. We only publish papers which are fully computationally reproducible. I also work on making our machine-learning software more user-friendly, reusable and extensible. Together with a PhD student I am thinking about how to use data from hospitals to help doctors and patients find the right treatment for each individual patient.

  • Personal highlights:

I work in data science and open and reproducible research are the things I think and care about the most. So to me it only made sense to get involved. Plus: the community seemed amazing! To me The Turing Way is a role model when it comes to collaborative, distributed work. I learned so much just by participating in the book sprint and seeing how Malvika, Kirstie and everyone else contributed to providing an extremely welcoming and at the same time productive space. I took what I learned and tried to apply it in other contexts such as teaching. I will continue to do so. The Turing Way also inspired me to think about new ways we could teach people about open and reproducible (data) science. I am currently thinking a lot about how we could use the content from The Turing Way and turn it into a course. This idea was also part of an application, where I proposed to start a new group on Open AI. Specifically, I have co-authored these chapters: Research Compendia, File Naming Convention, and reviewed many contributions. I regularly recommend The Turing Way as a resource. Both for learning more about reproducible data science and also when discussing specific topics. I think that people are taking it on and reading it :)

  • More information:

First, I would like to continue to help create content, review others content and be helpful in any way I can. Sometimes I like to look at really old issues and pull requests for example. Reviving such old, often almost finished bits, is very rewarding. Apart from that I also have a bigger, long term idea for The Turing Way. I personally am not a huge fan of reading. So books are not my favorite way to learn. In the past years I learned a lot by listening to others in talks, podcasts, videos, and of course conversations. So for me it is only a natural next step for The Turing Way to become more than a book. It could be an ecosystem, with the book at its basis. And – if we decide to go that route – I would like to be a part of it.

Irene K

  • Role: Book Dash November 2020 Attendee

  • GitHub id: irenekp

  • Short bio:

I’m an undergraduate student majoring in Information Science and Engineering. While short, my journey with Data Science and Data Management has been varied and I’ve loved watching how a single concept can mould into so many different disciplines! I have been able to work with data science as an RA for a couple of projects that focused on different aspects of Social Network Analysis. I’ve also been able to follow data management and related practices during my internships at a fintech and a telecom company.

  • Personal highlights:

Turing Way was my first foray into Open Source, and I have found it extremely helpful in learning both about general github and open source practices as well as being part of a moving and collaborative community. I especially loved being part of an extremely multidisciplinary group of people, really shows me the real span of Data Science! The ethics book has been a great source of interest for me as it encompasses many of the issues I both grappled with, debated and deliberated upon extensively during my own data science projects. During my time working on the Data Anonymization Chapter (Issue: #1578 , Pull Request: #1579 ) I managed to read more extensively about anonymization and I found answers to many of the questions that had previously bothered me. I really hope that the work we’ve done here to consolidate all these ethical guidelines will help make practicing data science with a strong ethical basis and clear moral conscience more easy and accessible.

  • More information:

In line with my contributions so far, I am extremely passionate about working on an ethical framework for Data Science, seeing as a lot of it focuses on exposing patterns that could easily be invasive, I really think an ethical approach to it is the only way to keep practicing it sustainably in the long term. Science Communication is an other one of my key areas of interest, I’ve been combining it with my love for sustainable practices (be it data science or water resource management) so far to research upon and write articles that I hope would inform and educate more people! I hope to add Data Visualization to this combination soon! I intend to keep working at the cross roads of Data Science and Sci-Comm for the foreseeable future!

Ismael Kherroubi Garcia

I’m Ethics Research Assistant at the Alan Turing Institute. I have a BSc in Business Management and Administration and am currently working towards an MSc in Philosophy of the Social Sciences. I am an associate member of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD).

  • Personal highlights:

Since my undergraduate degree, I have worked in fintech and then in arts organisations within human resources teams, finally reaching the Alan Turing Institute and helping support the Ethics Advisory Group. I think my highlight is that I’ve got a great background as a generalist! I am currently really thrilled to be working alongside Laura Carter and Sophia Batchelor to build a community around the Guide for Ethical Research! Personal quote: “Research Ethics is complex, and two related concepts are Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) and Research Integrity. Depending on whether we wear an RRI hat or research integrity goggles, we will encounter different research ethics questions. But it is important to wear the two at all times. I call this Steampunk Research Ethics.”

  • More information:

I am really fascinated by philosophical discussions about the social sciences, so I love the thought of questioning what an open science culture looks like and how to get there!

José María Fernández

  • Role: Book Dash November 2020 Attendee (BioHackathon-EU)

  • GitHub id: @jmfernandez

  • ORCID: 0000-0002-4806-5140.

  • Short bio:

I’m a senior research engineer from INB coordination unit, BSC, ELIXIR Spain. With an MSc in Computer Science, I have been working in bioinformatics since 1999, involved in very disparate projects along these years. Currently, I’m very involved in technical and scientific benchmarking, reproducibility and workflow execution abstractions, among other topics.

  • Personal highlights:

I have really enjoyed meeting so warming and the dynamic community around The Turing Way! I have mostly contributed to reviewing open Pull requests and networking with the community members.

Kim De Ruyck

Since 2016, I am managing the Belgian ELIXIR Node (we pursue FAIRification of research data and facilitating reproducible analysis, through activities in data management and analysis as well as training; we also focus on domain specific services in plant sciences, human health and proteomics). I was trained as a Bioscience engineer, have a PhD in Medical Sciences and performed medical genetics research for many years.

  • Personal highlights:

I started familiarizing myself with the GitHub environment and learned how to collaborate through it. It was especially nice to meet the vibrant community working together on the Turing Way! Specifically, I have authored a subchapter on Research Data Management Toolkit.

Laura Acion

I am a Biostatistician who transitioned to Data Science. I work at the University of Buenos Aires (Argentina). I specialize in several areas of Health Sciences. I am passionate about changing the way applied stats is taught and practiced. I have so much to learn and do; it seems I will need extra lives to accomplish all. More about me here.

  • Personal highlights:

I am currently co-developing a chapter on “Leadership in Data Science” and supporting Spanish community in translating and getting involved in the project. I hope this is my first of several Book Dashes! It was an outstanding experience. Thank you so much, Malvika and Kirstie, for brilliantly organizing and coordinating this event! ✨ 💖

Laura Carter

I’m a PhD candidate in the Human Rights Centre at the University of Essex, UK, researching the human rights implications of the use of data-driven technologies in the UK public sector, focusing on gender stereotyping and gender discrimination. Prior to my PhD, I worked as a human rights researcher for almost a decade, specialising mostly in human rights, sexual orientation and gender identity. I carried out field research in Europe and sub-Saharan Africa covering topics including homophobic and transphobic hate crimes, criminalisation of homosexuality and of sex work, legal gender recognition for trans people, and health rights for intersex people.

  • Personal highlights:

I’m really enjoying learning more about Open Science practices and communities! I’m excited to be part of an OLS-2 mentee cohort alongside Ismael Kherroubi Garcia and Sophia Batchelor, working on the Guide to Ethical Research: if you’re interested in building a community of thoughtful, reflective, ethical data scientists, please come and join us!

  • More information:

I’m interested in feminist and queer research methodologies and in interrogating structures of power and systems of categorisation. Throughout my career, most of my work has been on understanding these systems, how they work, and how they harm: so that they can be dismantled! More information about me on my website.

  • Personal Quote:

“I’m not from a tech field but I’ve learned so much about github as a tool for collaborative working: thanks so much for everyone who was part of the November 2020 book dash for all your useful advice!”

Louise Bowler

I’m a Research Data Scientist in the Alan Turing Institute’s Research Engineering Group. I have a degree in Physics from Imperial College London, after which I joined the Life Sciences Interface Doctoral Training Centre at the University of Oxford. I worked on an interdisciplinary PhD project that combined mathematical modelling, cardiac electrophysiology and safety pharmacology, and moved over to the Turing afterwards. Since then, I’ve worked on a range of projects spanning synthetic data, data visualisation, and of course, the Turing Way!

  • Personal highlights:

I got involved with The Turing Way via case studies of reproducibility in academic projects - essentially, I was a reproducibility detective during the initial phase of the project! :female_detective: The Turing Way was my first experience of working with collaborators from so many different institutions, and the community around this project has been a real highlight for me. My official time on the Turing Way has come to an end, but I still enjoy keeping in touch through the Book Dashes and other events.

  • More information:

As scientists, we share our work via papers and talks, but the intricacies of precisely how we implement an analysis pipeline or novel algorithm can be very difficult to convey in those formats. We’re currently seeing changes in the default way we want to publish our papers through the open access movement, and I’d love to see a similar change in mindset happen about the data that we collect and the code that we develop so that others can reproduce, learn from and build upon our work. I want to ensure that the route to sharing these types of research output is open to everyone, regardless of their level of programming experience - the route might not always be straightforward, but it’s a great opportunity to share and learn from our experiences! So many research projects now contain computational elements, yet it is easy to forget that not everyone has access to training in software engineering, or has a group of colleagues with such interests. If we say that we want people to make their research open and reproducible, we need to give them the tools they need to be confident in doing so. I see the Turing Way as the means of bridging that gap, by providing a friendly, practical and helpful guide for researchers at all stages of their careers.

Malvika Sharan

I am the community manager of The Turing Way at The Alan Turing Institute. I work with the community of diverse members to develop resources and ways that can make data science accessible for a wider audience. After receiving my Ph.D. in Bioinformatics and I worked at European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Germany, that helped me solidify my values as an Open Researcher and community builder. I co-founded the Open Life Science mentoring program in 2019 to help enhance access to Open Leadership tools for individuals interested in building communities around their work. I am also a fellow of the Software Sustainability Institute and a board member of the Open Bioinformatics Foundation.

  • Personal highlights:

As a community manager, I appreciate the opportunities for facilitating the work our contributors carry out in this community space while learning new skills and ideas from them. Through my talks, panel sessions, and workshops, I like to interact with members across different research domains, who I otherwise will never get a chance to meet. Besides connecting with members from diverse perspectives, my highlights in The Turing Way are co-developing community governance, acknowledgment pathways, and community resources in the Community Handbook for our members. I enjoy designing training resources around leadership in research in collaboration with Open Life Science.

María Nanton

  • Role: Bookdash May 2021 Attendee.

  • GitHub id: mcnanton

  • ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0426-2879

  • Short bio:

I’m a Data Analyst with a social communications background experienced in data analysis, reporting, and dashboarding in marketing, social and health data. I’m currently a Data Analyst at the Health Information and Statistics Office, part of the Ministry of Health of the Buenos Aires City Government. I’m also a TA at the University of Buenos Aires, a RLadies Buenos Aires organizer, and a social data analytics and data visualization instructor at EANT.

  • Personal highlights:

It was great to work on chapter 3 of the Guide of Communications and also managing to solve some Issues and review simple PRs related to other chapters along the way.

  • Quotes:

This was my first Book Dash and I can’t imagine a better environment to do some serious, challenging, and fun collaborative work. I’m immensely grateful to everyone I encountered this week, and I can’t wait to share the tools I’ve learned with fellow coworkers and members of data and research communities in Argentina.

Mariana Vivas

  • Role: Book Dash 2021 participant

  • GitHub id: marianaiv

  • Short bio:

I’m an undergrad physics student at the Central University of Venezuela. Working on my thesis and trying to do it reproducible.

  • Personal highlights:

Working on the introductory chapter for the Project Design Guide was incredible. I really enjoyed collaborating with Malvika in writing it. I’m also very happy to had an illustration made specifically for the chapter.

  • Quotes:

This Book Dash was my first time doing collaborative work. I really enjoyed meeting everyone - such a welcoming environment, I really appreciate it! I enjoyed collaborating with a chapter for The Turing Way, couldn’t be happier!

Marta Mangiarulo

  • Role: Book Dash 2020 & 2021 participant

  • GitHub id: Marta-MM

  • ORCID: 0000-0001-7995-3717

  • Short bio:

I am a Research Assistant and Teaching Fellow in Psychology at the University of Leicester. My main research interests involve probabilistic inference, social hypothesis testing, and reasoning biases. I am also passionate about science communication and research dissemination and interested in replicability, open science issues, and the interface between cognitive and social aspects in social psychology.

  • Personal highlights:

In the November 2020 book dash, I used GitHub for the first time! I helped fix some small bugs (grammar and syntax, typos, formatting) and, I proposed two chapters on data visualisation and on study pre-registration. I started familiarising myself with the GitHub environment and learned how to collaborate through it to provide valuable contributions to the project. My work during these 5 days has mostly been individual, but I would really love to collaborate with others to work on the two chapters I suggested! In the May 2021 book dash, I was very happy to start where I had left off in the previous bookdash. I believe I made small but relevant contributions and I have a clear idea of where I would like to go next which is much more than what I was hoping for!

  • More information:

I am passionate about science communication and research dissemination and interested in replicability, open science issues, and the interface between cognitive and social aspects in social psychology topics like intergroup relations and impression formation. At the moment I am particularly fascinated by data visualisation and infographics.

  • Quote:

I loved taking part in the bookdash, it is such a rewarding experience above and beyond its material outputs.

Martin O’Reilly

I’m Principal Research Software Engineer and Deputy Head of the Research Engineering Group at the Alan Turing Institute. My focus is on using good software engineering practices to increase the impact of research software by making it reusable, reliable and robust I also have a strong interest in reproducible research, and am working to improve the tools and working practices at the Turing to make it easier for our researchers to work reproducibly I’ve moved back and forth between industry and academia over the years, gaining an MSc in Artificial Intelligence and a PhD in Computational Neuroscience along the way.

  • More information:

I feel strongly that researchers have a responsibility to ensure that the outcomes of their research are made available to all - researchers, practitioners and the public. These outcomes should be made available in a way that allows others not just to reproduce them, but also to re-use and build upon them. An awful lot of researcher and practitioner time is spent getting to the point they can usefully evaluate whether some research is of use to them, or in re-discovering unpublished negative results. This seems extremely wasteful and I’m convinced we can and should do better. In particular, I feel a lot can be done to improve the effective re-use of data produced by research projects. While there has been significant progress in recent years in the amount of data published alongside research articles, there is still a wide gulf between open data and re-usable data. In terms of research areas, I’m fascinated by the brain and especially the approach of understanding the brain by “faking it” (i.e. modelling and simulation). I’m particularly interested in robots as a way of embodying these models in the real world. I believe the Turing Way can impact positively in both these areas. By providing recommended working practices and guidance on associated tooling, we can make it easy for researchers to do the right thing. By publishing this with the weight of the Turing brand, we can apply social pressure for the adoption of these practices as new norms in the research communities we operate in.

Martina G. Vilas

  • Role: Core contributor, JupyterBook Infrastructure Maintainer (2020), OLS-2 for Turing mentor, Book Dash 2020 Attendee and helper

  • GitHub id: martinagvilas

  • ORCID: 0000-0002-1097-8534

  • Short bio:

I’m currently finishing my PhD in Neuroscience at the Max-Planck-Institute AE in Frankfurt, Germany. I study how the brain processes conceptual knowledge analyzing neural recordings with computational modelling techniques. As an advocate of open-research, I also work on improving the reproducibility of neuroscientific-analyses and enjoy contributing to open-source software projects.

  • Personal highlights:

Since the Book Dash in February 2020, I help with the maintenance of The Turing Way infrastructure and its reliance on Jupyter Book. The Turing Way is not only a great guide for conducting reproducible research, but it also provides a wonderful entry point into open-source contribution in general and connects you to a variety of open data-science communities. I’m also a mentor at the OLS-2 program and I have also worked with the pandas core-contributors in providing guidance to people from underrepresented groups in technology on making their first open-source contribution. I have co-led and developed the tutorial on Creating a Jupyter Book with The Turing Way (Github repo). During the Book Dash (November 2020), I worked with @BatoolMM on the upgrade of the Jupyter Book that allows for annotation (PR #1516). I facilitated mentored contributions (in spanish as well 🇦🇷 🇧🇴 ) I also gave a talk about The Turing Way and computational reproducibility at the Brainhack Donostia 2020 (slides here)

  • More information:

More information about me can be read on my website.

Nina Di Cara

  • Role: Book Dash 2021 participant

  • GitHub id: ninadicara

  • ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6179-1067

  • Short bio:

I am a PhD student at the University of Bristol, working on data science for mental health using social media data. I also have a masters degree in family social work, and was trained as a social worker before starting my PhD. I co-organise the Data Ethics Club, and am really interested in how we can understand the way we approach data analysis as a function of our lived experiences and positionality.

  • Personal highlights:

I started to design and draft a new chapter about self-reflection for data scientists, and was really excited to meet lots of fascinating and kind people who are also working on the Guide for Ethical Research!

  • Quotes:

Being part of the Book Dash has been a great reminder of how team-based science can be such a joyful and fun experience! An especially well-timed reminder after spending a year working from my flat!

Patricia Herterich

I am a Research Data Specialist at University of Edinburgh’s Digital Curation Centre, UK. I am a 2019 Software Sustainability Institute Fellow and HiddenREF committee member. From 2016 to 2019, I worked as Research Repository Advisor at the University of Birmingham. From 2012 to 2016, I’ve worked at CERN as a doctoral student supporting Open Research stuff and then abandoned the PhD and started a real job using all the skills I aquired.

  • Personal highlights:

Working on the Turing Way reminded me about what I value in my work and that I do have more technical skill than I think. Based on the Turing Way work, I have started the product managmement role for DMPonline and I’m trying to take the inspiration from the project into my every day work whenever I can.

  • More information:

As a librarian, it feels like our influence is often limited, but I try to set up workshops/events to at least get the discussion started and give especially PhD students the feeling that they can challenge the status quo and there will be people in the institution that will support them that might not be their supervisor. I really love how the Turing Way aims to create good examples and I hope we can develop some ideas and resources that can have a positive impact in changing the current system. I care about collaborating and get really excited about trying new tools if my limited tech skills allow.

Paul Owoicho

I am a Technical Writer / Google Season of Docs (GSoD) Participant working to make The Turing Way consistent, sustainable, and accessible. I have a BSc in Software Engineering from the American University of Nigeria. Thereafter, I worked as a Research Analyst in the Fintech & Innovation Division of Guaranty Trust Bank, Nigeria and helped to drive the Bank’s push to become a platform by creating innovative digital products. I completed a Master’s in Data Science from the University of Glasgow and starting my PhD in January 2021 studying conversational information-seeking systems. I spent two years as a Research Analyst at Guaranty Trust Bank in Lagos, Nigeria helping to build innovative digital products to meet the Bank’s customer objectives.

  • Personal highlights:

The Turing Way is my first foray into open source and has been a fantastic learning experience. Not only have I gained a deeper understanding and appreciation for how GitHub works, but I am also learning to prioritise sustainability and empowerment in the work that I do. Although The Turing Way is my first open source project, I thoroughly enjoyed the experience and learned a lot along the way. Before the GSoD program, I only used Github to ‘store’ my projects. Now, I am much more proficient at using Github for collaborative endeavours and I am more adept at working with tools such as Markdown, Jupyter Book, and Sphinx. In addition, I gained familiarity with setting up and working with web analytics software. You can see the full report from GSoD participation here. The BookDash November 2020 was great! It was awesome to meet, collaborate, and share ideas with people from around the world. Beyond the Book Dash, The Turing Way is the very first open-source project I have ever worked on. The experience has been fantastic, and I intend to stick around as a contributor after the Google Season of Docs program ends. I also see myself getting involved in other open-source projects.

  • Personal Quote:

Asides technical skills, I developed a deep appreciation for what working on an open source project entails. My mentors helped me realise that the value I left behind from the GSoD program was not in the amount of work I did, but how I enabled other contributors to also do the work I was doing. As a result, I learned to contribute as a Technical Writer in a manner that was reproducible, sustainable, accessible, and inclusive.

Rosie Higman

I am a Research Data Librarian at the University of Manchester, co-leading the research data management support service. My focus is on data sharing, training and encouraging researchers to engage in Open Research. My background is in the social sciences and I have recently started a PhD with the British Library and the University of Sheffield looking at Open Access and the role of the National Library.

  • More information:

I am passionate about Supporting researchers! Making it as easy as possible for researchers to make their research reproducible and open, and for this to be easier than undertaking research in a closed manner. I try to help researchers make small improvements in making their research open, on the basis that some progress is better than none! Working in research data management I’m naturally concerned that data is not taken seriously as an independent research output and the reward system in academia is so heavily geared towards ‘high impact’ journal articles. As someone from a non-STEM background I’m also interested in how we can make reproducible research as accessible as possible. This will be the first project where I’ve worked directly in GitHub and I’m excited to get more confident in using it! I spend much of my time talking to researchers about the overarching principles of why reproducible and open research is a good idea and am excited by the idea of giving people practical guidance on how to do this. Messy code is frequently cited in these discussions as a reason for not sharing code so if we could produce something which helps people get past this barrier would be great. I hope that the Turing Way will be something we can also use at the University of Manchester and other Turing universities around the country!

Rachael Ainsworth

I am the Research Software Community Manager at the Software Sustainability Institute. Previously, I worked as a Research Associate and Open Science Champion at the Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics at the University of Manchester. My research involved observing jets from young stars with next-generation radio telescopes to investigate the physical processes that assemble stars like our Sun, and am currently working to make data from the radio telescope facilities at Jodrell Bank more accessible to all. I am also a FOSTER certified Open Science Trainer, Mozilla Open Leader, and Organiser for the women in data meetup group HER+Data MCR.

  • Personal highlights:

I have promoted The Turing Way through many presentations, notably at the Open Science Fair 2019 where I presented a poster and delivered 3 demonstrations of the project to attendees, one of which was recorded as part of the ORION Open Science Podcast. Through The Turing Way project I have gained valuable skills in open project management and met truly inspiring individuals working hard to promote openness and reproducibility in research.

  • More information:

I am passionate about promoting openness, transparency, reproducibility, wellbeing and inclusion in STEM and facilitating cross-stakeholder conversations in order to change research culture for the better. I also love space exploration. The Turing Way goal of ensuring that reproducible data science is “too easy not to do” really resonates with me. I find that it can be difficult to get researchers to engage with reproducibility and sharing their research outputs because they perceive that it will take too much time and effort with very little reward - when the opposite is true! Ensuring results are reproducible not only benefits research as a whole and increases efficiency, but working this way also offers researchers more opportunities for impact and collaboration.

Samuel Guay

I’m a PhD student in Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Montreal, Canada, researching the effects of repetitive head impacts inactive and retired athletes with a neuroimaging perspective. In parallel, I’ve started the Open Science UMontreal initiative to equip early-career scientists with better knowledge and tools to implement more open science in their workflow. The OSUM community members are really awesome :rocket:. Specifically, I have been working to set a process to translate The Turing Way in French. I contributed to adding hypothes.is to The Turing Way.

  • Personal highlight:

The whole November 2020 Book Dash was my highlight. I got to know a welcoming community and amazing humans throughout the week. It was amazing to witness so much progress in that tiny amount of time.

Sarah Gibson

  • Role: Core contributor, Infrastructure Maintainer (2019 - present), OLS-2 for Turing mentor, Book Dash 2020 helper

  • GitHub id: sgibson91

  • ORCID: 0000-0003-0356-2765

  • Short bio:

I am a Research Software Engineer at The Alan Turing Institute where I implement software best practices to translate academic research into real world solutions through the Turing’s collaborative network. I am also an operator and maintainer for the Binder project and runs a BinderHub cluster at the Turing which receives traffic from mybinder.org. In 2020, I am also honoured to be a Software Sustainability Institute Fellow and to continue advocating for reproducible and sustainable research through software.

  • Personal highlights:

Becoming a core member of The Turing Way and Project Binder, and helping people all around the world launch and share their analyses in the cloud.

  • More information:

I’m passionate about applying the skills I learnt during my PhD somewhere closer to home and learning new skills along the way. The Turing Way is an ideal opportunity for me to learn better research practices and widen my horizons from what academia has taught me.

Sophia Batchelor

I am a PhD student at the University of Leeds studying sensorimotor learning with the Center for Immersive Technologies. My research focuses on understanding how how our brains interprets, and responds to both our physical reality, and a constructed reality (AR/VR). I do this through a deep love of the brain and emerging technologies. We will soon be existing in the future that we are creating now; so when we build with a “people first” (or a brain first) philosophy, we end up building a space that allows people to flourish.

  • Personal highlights:

MY FIRST CONTRIBUTION TO THE TURING WAY! It’s an absolute honor to join The Turing Way community as we look towards an open, ethical, and accessible future. After having such a mixed STEM and non-STEM background, I’m thrilled to have joined this community as it grows and guides my thinking about how and what it means to do research.

  • More information:

I’m a fierce advocate for ethical and open research, and those beliefs tend to carry into everything I do. I previously worked on Brain Computer Interfaces after finishing my undergrad at UC Berkeley where I saw the incredible work that can be done through collaborative, crossdisciplinary science. I’m now part of Open Life Science’s second cohort learning how to implement the teachings of The Turing Way because when good science and good practice meets, great things can happen.

Tim Powell

Tim is an Astrophysicist turned Research Software Engineer, who has always had a passion for sharing science. From attending public lectures and getting involved as an attendee at outreach events based around Cambridge as a teenager to building a miniature supercomputer, Tim has a long history of outreach activities. Whilst at university Tim became a STEM Ambassador with the Physics Society, where he used the tools provided to introduce groups of children to scientific concepts. Tim also participated in 4 British Science Weeks showcasing many different aspects of Physics and Remote Sensing. When Tim joined STFC’s Hartree Centre he built a miniature supercomputer, called HPiC. HPiC is the Hartree Centre’s Raspberry Pi Cluster. It was created to demonstrate supercomputing techniques and show some of the expertise of the Hartree Centre. HPiC has been showcased at numerous technical conferences and public outreach events not just across the UK but also internationally. As well as presenting technical posters and talks at various conferences Tim also enjoys taking his experience of outreach and presenting what he has learnt and how that is applicable to teaching. Tim presented at the ISC 2019 HPC Education and Training for Emerging Technologies Workshop and was on SIGHPC Best Practices for HPC Training and Education Panel at Supercomputing 2019. One of Tim’s proudest projects was collaborating with Benjamin Mummery on a LEGO version of the Hartree Centre’s iconic supercomputer Scafell Pike!

  • Personal highlights:

I collaborated with a group of researchers from The Alan Turing Institute to draft a chapter of scientific outreach.

Collaborating Organisations

When members participate in The Turing Way community with the in-kind support of their funders and organisation, we acknowledge each member individually and list their organisations as “Collaborating organisations”. Such organisational supports are applicable when one or multiple members from a project or community collaborate to build resources in The Turing Way.

Delft University of Technology - Faculty of Applied Sciences

The Faculty of Applied Sciences is the largest of Delft University of Technology and focuses on finding innovative solutions to some of the problems faced by society. Development of the fundamental knowledge needed to underpin technical developments that can be widely used throughout society. In ensuring that this knowledge can be shared efectively with the wider society, the Faculty values the sharing of data and code and has a Research Data Management policy in place since 2020. In this effort, the contributions from the Faculty of Applied Sciences have mainly focused on the Reproducible Research Chapter of The Turing Way.

Esther Plomp

I’m a Data Steward at the Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, in the Netherlands, where I support researchers with their data management and open science practices. For my PhD research, I analysed human teeth for their isotopic/chemical composition in order to say something about human mobility patterns (fields of forensics, archaeology, osteology). Next to the Turing Way I’m also involved with other teams, such as the Open Research Calendar (follow the calendar on Twitter!), IsoArcH and I was an OLS3 mentor! I’m also interested in anything related to physical samples in research, and I’m a co-chair of the Research Data Alliance Physical Samples Interest Group.

  • Personal highlights:

Thanks to the Turing Way I really learned how to work collaboratively using GitHub. The book dash in February 2020 was a great kick start to actually practise and directly apply these skills, which now allows me to contribute more confidently to other projects as well! I primarily contributed to the Reproducible Research Chapter, to the Research Data Management section. I reviewed existing content and I’m working on adding a section on Data Management Plans and how to handle personal data. I also made a The Turing Way poster that I presented during a conference. I hope to pay it forward and facilitate others in learning how to work with GitHub through The Turing Way or The Carpentries workshops. I’m very grateful to be part of this great and inclusive community!

  • More information:

I think scientific research should be accessible to anyone that would like to learn and contribute. I’m hoping to bring together specialists from my research field to establish guidelines for isotopic data from human remains and guidelines for how to handle and document physical samples. I’m a co-chair of the Research Data Alliance group Physical Samples and Collections in the Research Data Ecosystem IG. Please do get in touch if you work with physical samples and would like to get involved! I’m part of the Open Research Calendar Team. This is a calendar that you can use to stay up to date with open research events, or add your own events to in order to increase visibility. Visit us at the Open Research Calendar Website or follow the calendar on Twitter!

  • Quote:

The 2021 May Book Dash was an exciting opportunity for me to look behind the organisation scenes and to be a part of an amazing team. The week itself was absolutely amazing, especially the discussions and the ‘show and tell’ session!

Netherlands eScience Center

The Netherlands eScience Center is the Dutch national hub for the development and application of domain overarching software and methods for the scientific community. Their main goal is to enable scientists with varying computing experience to fully utilize the potential of the available e-infrastructure and allow them to achieve otherwise unreachable scientific breakthroughs. The Netherlands eScience Center is primarily funded by the national research council (NWO) and the national e-infrastructure organization (SURF) of the Netherlands.

The Netherlands eScience center maintains its own guide for reproducible software development. The focus of the eScience center guide has a big overlap with The Turing Way and therefore it makes sense to avoid duplicating efforts. The eScience center contributes to The Turing Way in the areas which are relevant for the eScience guide. The eScience guide points to The Turing Way in when information would otherwise be duplicated.

Details of each members with their contributions have been listed alphabetically.

Carlos Martinez Oritz

Carlos obtained his PhD in Computer Science at the University of Exeter. Afterwards he worked on various research projects at the University of Exeter and Plymouth University. At the eScience Center, he has worked as an engineer in diverse projects in digital humanities and life sciences, developing expertise in natural language processing, linked open data and software sustainability. He is also a certified Software Carpentry instructor and is frequently involved in organising trainings.

  • Personal highlights:

We always advocate for software reuse and collaborative development of software. I love that we can do the same for software development guidelines: reuse content from the eScience guide and collaboratively develop with The Turing Way community!

  • More information:

I am a big advocate of improving software quality. I am really glad that the eScience center is collaborating with The Turing Way in providing guidelines and helping build better research software.

Mateusz Kuzak

Mateusz obtained his master degree in Biotechnology with specialization Biophysics, at the Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland. In September 2019 Mateusz joined the Netherlands eScience Center in the role of Community Officer with the focus on communities and training around Research Software Engineering, software best practices and sustainability, and the role of software in open science and reproducible research. Since 2015, Mateusz has been involved in the Carpentries community, first as an instructor, later contributor, mentor, Executive Council member and instructor trainer. He is also leading the Dutch chapter of the Carpentries and is on the core team of nl-RSE community.

  • Personal highlights:

I have personally contributed to The Turing Way by drafting chapters in the guide for Reproducible Research, reviewed other contributor’s Pull Requests and mentored contributions from Netherlands eScience Center.

Contributors

Thanks goes to these wonderful people (emoji key):


Adina Wagner

🖋

Aditi Shenvi

🤔

Afzal Ansari

🐛

Ago3

🤔

Ahmed Essam

🐛

Aida Mehonic

🤔

Albert Hornos Vidal

👀 🐛

Alex Bird

👀

Alex Chan

🤔

Alex Clarke

📖

Alexander Morley

💬 👀 🤔 ⚠️ 🚇 🚧

Ali Seyhun Saral

📖

Andrea Pierré

🐛

Andrei Alexandru

🐛 👀

Andrew Stewart


Andrian Nobella

🌍

Angelo Varlotta

🌍

Anna Hadjitofi

🖋 🌍

Anna Krystalli

💬 💡 👀 🤔

Annabel Elizabeth Whipp

🤔

Arielle-Bennett

🤔 👀 🖋

Augustinas Sukys

🤔

Barbara Vreede

🖋

Batool

🤔 🖋 🌍 🚇

Becki Green

🤔

Becky Arnold

💬 💻 📖 🤔 👀

Benjamin Mummery

🤔 🖋

Beth Montague-Hellen

📖

Bouwe Andela

🖋

Brandon Lee

🐛

Brigitta Sipőcz

🖋

Bruno Camino

🖋

Callum Mole

🤔

Cameron Trotter

🤔

Camila Rangel Smith

📖 🌍 🚧

Carlos Martinez

🐛 👀 🖋

Carlos Vladimiro González Zelaya

🤔

Cassandra Gould van Praag

🤔 📖

Cem Ulus

🌍

Chad Gilbert

🐛

Chandler Klein

🐛

Chanuki Illushka Seresinhe

📖

Charlotte Watson

🤔

Chris Holdgraf

💬 🤔

Chris Markiewicz

🤔

Chris Tomlinson

🤔

Christina Hitrova

🤔

Christopher Lovell

🚇

Clare Liggins

📖

Colin Sauze

🤔 🖋

Dan Hobley

📖

Danbee Kim

📖

Daniel Lintott

🐛

Daniel Mietchen

🐛

Daniel Nüst

🖋

Danny Garside

🐛

David Foster

👀 🐛

David Stansby

🖋

DerienFe

🤔

Diego Alonso Alvarez

🤔 👀

Dimitra Blana

👀 🖋

Eirini Malliaraki

📖

Eirini Zormpa

🐛 👀

Elizabeth DuPre

🚇 💬 👀

Em K

🖋 🐛 📝 👀 📢

Enrico Glerean

🐛

Eric Daub

📖

Eric Leung

🐛

Eric R Scott

🐛

Esther Plomp

🐛 🤔 🖋 👀 📢 📝 🌍

Evelina Gabasova

🐛 🖋

Federico Nanni

🐛 🖋

Ferran Gonzalez Hernandez

🤔

Florian Gilcher

🐛

Frances Cooper

🖋 🤔

Frances Madden

🖋

Fuad Reza Pahlevi

🌍

Georgia

🤔

Georgia Atkinson

🤔

Georgia Tomova

🤔

Georgiana Elena

👀

Gertjan van den Burg

📖 🤔 💬

Gianni Scolaro

🐛

Graham Lee

🐛 👀

Greg Kiar

📖 👀

Gustavo Becelli do Nacimento

🌍

Heidi Seibold

🤔 🖋

Hieu Hoang

🤔

Ian Hinder

📖

IsabelBirds

🤔

Isil Bilgin

🐛

Ismael-KG

🖋 👀 📝 🤔

JKasmire

🐛

Jade Pickering

📖

James Kent

🐛

James Myatt

📖

James Robinson

🤔 💻

James Thomas

🐛

Jason Gates

📖 👀

Javier Moldon

📖

Jay Dev Jha

🐛

Jeremy Leipzig

🐛

Jessica

🖋

Jessy Provencher

🌍

Jez Cope

📖

Jill Wang

🐛

Jim Madge

🖋 📖

Joanna Leng

🖋 🤔

Joe Early

🤔

Joe Fennell

📖

Joshua Teves

🤔

José María Fernández

👀

Julien Colomb

🖋

Katherine Dixey

🤔

Kelly-dot

🤔

Kesson Magid

🤔

Kevin Kunzmann

📖 🤔 🐛

Kim De Ruyck

🐛

Kim De Ruyck

🖋

Kirstie Whitaker

💬 📖 🎨 📋 🔍 🤔 👀 📢

Kristijan Armeni

🐛

Krunal Rank

🐛

Lachlan Mason

🤔 📖 💻

Laura Acion

️️️️♿️ 🌍 🖋

Laura Carter

👀 🐛 🤔 🖋

Lenka

📝

Liberty Hamilton

🐛

Louise Bowler

💬 💻 📖 💡 🤔 📋 👀

Lovkush

🐛

Luca Bertinetto

🌍

Lupe CaMay

👀

Malvika Sharan

📖 📋 🤔 📆 👀 📢 🚧 📹

Maria Eriksson

🐛

Mariam-ke

🐛

Mariana V.

🐛

Mark Woodbridge

🤔 🖋

Markus Löning

👀 🖋

Marta-MM

🐛

Martin O'Reilly

💬 🔧 🤔

Martina G. Vilas

🚇 ⚠️ 📢 📹

Mateusz Kuzak

🐛 📋 🤔 👀 🖋

Matthew Evans

🐛

Max Joseph

👀

Michael Grayling

📖

Miguel Rivera

🐛

Mustafa Anil Tuncel

🐛

Nadia Soliman

📖

Naomi Penfold

👀 🤔

Natacha Chenevoy

🤔

Natalie Thurlby

💻 ⚠️

Nathan Begbie

🐛 🤔

Neha Moopen

👀 🖋

Neil Chue Hong

🤔

Nick Barlow

🐛 🖋

Nico

🤔

Nicolás Alessandroni

🤔

Nomi Harris

👀

NotActuallyACat

🤔

Obi Thompson Sargoni

🤔

Oliver Clark

📖

Oliver Forrest

📖 🤔 🖋 👀

Oliver Hamelijnck

🤔

Oliver Strickson

💬 📖

Oscar Giles

📖

Pablo Rodríguez-Sánchez

🖋

Patricia Herterich

💬 📖 👀 🤔 🖋

Paul Dominick Baniqued

🤔

Paul Owoicho

🤔 👀 🐛 📖

Paula Andrea Martinez

🤔 👀

Pedro Pinto da Silva

🤔

PeterC-ATI

🤔

Philip Darke

🤔

Pierre Grimaud

🐛

Pooja Gadige

📖

Pranav Mahajan

🖋

Przemek Dolata

🌍

Rachael Ainsworth

📖 📋 🤔 💬 👀 📢

Radka Jersakova

🐛 🖋

Raniere Silva

🖋

Reina Camacho Toro

🌍

Remi Gau

🐛

Reshama Shaikh

🐛

Richard Gilham

📖 🤔

Risa Ueno

🤔

Robert Precious

️️️️♿️

Robin Long

📖

Rohit Midha

📖

Romero Silva

🌍

Rose Sisk

🤔

Rosie Higman

💬 📋 👀 🤔

Rosti Readioff

📖

SYU-NING

🤔

Samuel Guay

🌍

Samuel Nastase

🐛

Sangram K Sahu

🤔

Sarah Gibson

💬 💻 📖 🔧 👀 📢 🤔 📹

Sarah Stewart

📖 🤔

SarahAlidoost

🖋

Sedar Olmez

🤔

Shankho Boron Ghosh

🐛

Sian Bladon

🤔

Siba Smarak Panigrahi

🐛

Solon

🤔

Sophia Batchelor

👀 🤔 🚧

Sparkler

🌍

Srishti Nema

🐛 🖋

Stefan Janssen

🌍

Stefan Verhoeven

🖋

Stephan Druskat

📖 🖋 🤔

Stephen Eglen

👀

Sumera Priyadarsini

🐛

Susanna-Assunta Sansone

📖

Tania Allard

🤔 💬

Tarek Allam

🚇 📖

Tess Gough

🤔

Thomas Sandmann

🌍

Tim Head

💬 🤔

Tim Powell

🤔 🖋

Tony Yang

📖 🌍 🚇

Tushar Rohilla

🐛 🖋

Veronika Cheplygina

🤔

Victoria

🤔

Victoria Dominguez del Angel

🐛

Warrick Ball

🤔 🖋

Wiebke Toussaint

🐛

Will Hulme

📖

Wolmar Nyberg Åkerström

👀

Xiaoqing Chen

🤔

Yash Varshney

🐛

Yini

🌍

Yo Yehudi

📖 👀

Yu-Fang Yang

🐛

abrown41

🤔 🖋

acork25

🤔

akira-endo

🤔

alessandroragano

🤔

alihumayun

🐛 👀

andreabecsek

🤔

andrealuppi

🤔

ashatitus

👀 🖋

beccawilson

️️️️♿️

benkrikler

🤔 🖋

ceciledebezenac

🤔

daniguariso

🤔

giuliaok

🤔

glumand

🌍

griff-rees

🐛

irenekp

🖋

kgrieman

🤔

l-gorman

🤔

leavanh

🐛

lottycoupat

🐛

mcnanton

🐛

mjcasy

🤔 🖋

msanter01

🌍 📢

oxpeter

🐛

peterrhysstrong

🤔

rabbits99

🌍

sallyob123

🤔

sethsh7

🤔

sliaqat3

👀

smasarone

🤔

swalkoAI

🤔

takuover

🤔

tugceoruc

🤔

vasilisstav

🤔

yaseminturkyilmaz

📝 🤔

This project follows the all-contributors specification. Contributions of any kind welcome!